Ken “Stand up and Ride ” on Mountainstepper

Posted by on Mar 15, 2014 in News, Testimonials

Ken “Stand up and Ride ” on Mountainstepper

Back in 2011, I had the only Streetstepper in the USA and although I was impressed with it, I only wrote a few blog posts about it since it wasn’t available in America. After many email inquiries from people wanting one, I realized that I was telling all the kids how delicious the candy was and then informing them they couldn’t have any. I am now on the edge of my seatless bike in anticipation of Streetstepper USA, which is on track to be shipping Streetsteppers to riders in America — just in time for the 2014 riding season.
If I sound excited, it’s because I am. I’ve watched Streetstepper’s progress over the past few years and have seen the design change on their bikes. Recently, I got the opportunity to finally ride one of the new models. The Streetstepper MTS 26 is their mountain biking version and has 26-inch wheels, a front shock, disc brakes, and 30 gears. It looks a lot like a standard mountain bike without the seat, but the similarities end when you step on and start to ride.
My ride started at the bottom of a very intimidatingly steep paved road. The 13.5% grade was not what I had envisioned for my first ride on a new bike, but it was only about quarter-mile climb before the road would intersect with another, and mellow to an average of a little over 6% for the next few miles. I jumped on, geared down and started the grind. The first 1/4 mile dropped surprisingly easily and the next couple of miles were amazing. Although the road averaged 6% plus, the variations went from almost flat in places to well over 10%. It was a great environment to get a feel for the gears and their range. The climbing ability of this bike was incredible, especially for a first ride. It handled all the grades with ease and grace. I’m not saying I didn’t get a workout, because I did, but the climbing ability actually surprised me.
Streetstepper USAWhen I reached the summit, I took a few quick pictures and headed back down, testing the other side of the gear range on the way. The downhill experience was similar to what I observed on the Streetstepper Sport, but enhanced by the bigger tires and more gears. The ride was fast and stable and more like downhill skiing than biking. When I got back down, I decided to exit the asphalt and see what it was like in the dirt.
I found an area that allowed me to do a little climbing and some small drops. I was a little disappointed initially in the climbing until I figured out some technique, and then it did great. The small drops were fun and solid and took me back to my mountain biking days. The bike has great clearance for off-road terrain, and the position of the pedals allows the rider to keep his weight way back when dropping a steep section. This makes for great dirt downhill.
When I finished riding, it was almost dark and a smile was plastered on my face as I headed back to the car. I ride a lot of Stand Up bikes and have never been so impressed with a first ride. This bike is a performer and is going to be a huge player in the market. The exact details of it’s availability in the U.S. are still being held close to the chest — but from what I’ve been told, it will be soon. In the meantime, stay tuned for more write ups and join the Step Biker Facebook group to ask questions and keep current on the details.

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